Melodic Breezes (1), 64 x 94 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (5), 64 x 94 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (11), 94 x 64 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (18), 94 x 64 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (19), 94 x 64 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (20), 94 x 64 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (25), 64 x 94 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (12), 34 x 24 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (13), 34 x 24 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (16), 34 x 24 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (15), 34 x 24 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (33), 34 x 24 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (1), 160 x 100 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (2), 100 x 160 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (3), 100 x 160 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (6), 160 x 100 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (4), 100 x 160 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper
Melodic Breezes (5), 100 x 160 cm, 2020, ink on japanese paper

MELODIC BREEZES

It was during an artist-in-residence programme in the wide landscape of Mecklenburg, the wind became the image-determining theme.

But where do we see the wind? How can it be portrayed? It comes from the air, however, it visibly sways primarily the plants, especially impressive when blowing across fields of grain, bending trees, whirling leaves. Nina Stoelting once again reached for trees, broke off long branches from pollarded willows, experimented with oak leaves and lime blossoms, discovered the filigree structure of the Juniper, the complex thread of the wood as “paint brush”. These authentic pieces of tree were dipped in ink and swung rhythmically over the paper, at times stormily, at times gently, at times hardly leaving a trace. A characteristic style seems to be inscribed in each of these trees, comparable to a sheet of musical notes.

While working in her studio, Nina Stoelting is always listening to music, not just as a background, but music chosen with purpose; the musical theme should relate to that of the painting, often enhancing the latter. Thus, the artist achieves an intense concentration she describes as the music flowing through her body, her thoughts focused on the theme of the picture, her hand merely executing.